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Uber and the Surveilance Society

Yeah, this is just great.

As we move headlong into the total surveillance, totally cashless, and eventually private-car-less, driver-less, computer-controlled, collectivist transportation network so loved by crypto-communists, anti-human climate change hoaxers, and their parasitical corporate donors and beneficiaries....

..... Uber unabashedly promotes itself by bragging that its marvelous technology allows its zombie acolytes to,

"5. Retrace your steps

Classes, practices, clubs, parties—it’s a lot to keep track of. Luckily, your Uber receipts provide a record of everywhere you’ve been and what time."

For one thing, who cares about "keeping track" of the stuff you've ALREADY DONE?

The NSA?

Before local governments mandated spy cameras for all non-Uber taxis they were fairly private conveyances. Since these cameras are only accessed in response to reported incidents, privacy in cabs is still very secure, especially for those who pay with cash.

What happens in taxis, stays in taxis.

In a sane society, the fact that Uber boasts about its collection of all of the classes you attend, the bars and parties you go to should be enough to convince most people to avoid Uber like the plague.

But instead, in this day and age, privacy is becoming a dirty word.

"Civilization is the progress toward a society of privacy. The savage's whole existence is public, ruled by the laws of his tribe. Civilization is the process of setting man free from men." -- Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead (1943)

And for those boneheads (you know who you are) who, at this point say,

"I don't need to value privacy. I haven't done anything wrong," I recommend you read, "Three Felonies A Day: How the Feds Target the Innocent" by Harvey Silverglate and Alan M. Dershowitz,

and get back to me.

From the description,

"The average professional in this country wakes up in the morning, goes to work, comes home, eats dinner, and then goes to sleep, unaware that he or she has likely committed several federal crimes that day. Why? The answer lies in the very nature of modern federal criminal laws, which have exploded in number but also become impossibly broad and vague. In Three Felonies a Day, Harvey A. Silverglate reveals how federal criminal laws have become dangerously disconnected from the English common law tradition and how prosecutors can pin arguable federal crimes on any one of us, for even the most seemingly innocuous behavior. The volume of federal crimes in recent decades has increased well beyond the statute books and into the morass of the Code of Federal Regulations, handing federal prosecutors an additional trove of vague and exceedingly complex and technical prohibitions to stick on their hapless targets. The dangers spelled out in Three Felonies a Day do not apply solely to “white collar criminals,” state and local politicians, and professionals. No social class or profession is safe from this troubling form of social control by the executive branch, and nothing less than the integrity of our constitutional democracy hangs in the balance."

Another book I recommend is "Battlefield America: The War On The American People" by John W. Whitehead for a nightmarish account of where we are heading.


Update: April 26, 2017 see "Uber Secretly Tagged User's Phones."

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